Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Stanford Talisman at Baccalaureate

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Envisioning and educating for a more just and inclusive future.

Statement of Solidarity, Summer 2020
  • Statement of Solidarity, Summer 2020
  • DEI-related Projects and Goals, Fall and Winter 2020–21
  • DEI-related Project Update, Summer and Fall 2021
  • DEI-related Project Update, Winter and Spring 2022

Statement of Solidarity, Summer 2020

The Stanford Program on International and Cross-Cultural Education (SPICE) unequivocally condemns the systemic racism that permeates U.S. society and fully supports the recent calls for social justice and equity. 

Click below for reflections by the SPICE Director.

DEI-related Projects and Goals, Fall and Winter 2020–21

The Stanford Program on International and Cross-Cultural Education (SPICE) joins other university centers and programs at Stanford in condemning the police murder of George Floyd and countless others. As FSI Director Dr. Michael McFaul notes in his letter, “His murder has punctuated a long, tragic history of racial injustice and police violence targeted at the Black community. This moment calls for all of us to reassess our work and how we can move our local community, nation and the world to achieve racial justice.”

SPICE serves as a bridge between FSI and K–12 schools and community colleges and the SPICE staff agrees to do more to help move our local community, nation, and the world to achieve racial justice. SPICE works in three areas: (1) curriculum development; (2) teacher professional development; and (3) online course offerings. Below are a few recent efforts that SPICE has made with the goal of achieving racial justice.

Curriculum: SPICE has recently launched an interactive website called “What Does It Mean to Be an American?” It focuses on topics like civil liberties & equity, civic engagement, and justice & reconciliation and includes videos called “What Does It Mean to Be a Young Black Man in America?” and “What It Means to Be Muslim American.” Student reflections on the website were featured in articles on December 8, 2020 and January 19, 2021. This article series will continue in 2021.

SPICE will be collaborating with the Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) to introduce underrepresented minority high school students to issues in international security and increase awareness of career opportunities available in international security.

Teacher Professional Development: Given the pandemic, SPICE has transitioned its teacher professional development seminars to online webinars. Two recent webinars have been “Angel Island Immigration Station: The Hidden History,” which focused on Chinese immigration to the United States in the early to mid-20th century; and “Visualizing the Essential: Mexicans in the U.S. Agricultural Workforce,” which focused in large part on the Bracero Program. SPICE is in the midst of planning more webinars that focus on the contributions of the BIPOC community.

Online Course Offerings: SPICE currently offers three courses (on China, Japan, and Korea) for high school students in the United States and courses for students in Japan and China. SPICE seeks to broaden its offerings in the United States.

 

SPICE pledges to do the following:

  • In its recruitment of students for SPICE’s online classes, we will redouble our efforts to recruit from diverse areas throughout the United States.
  • SPICE will seek to increase the diversity of the teachers who attend its teacher professional development seminars.
  • SPICE will seek to expand the diversity of the students who enroll in its online course offerings.
  • SPICE will continue to host webinars that focus on diversity.
  • SPICE will continue to explore—with the FSI REDI Task Force—additional outreach activities that focus on enhancing diversity at FSI.

DEI-related Project Update, Summer and Fall 2021

SPICE serves as a bridge between FSI and K–12 schools and community colleges. As noted in fall 2020, the SPICE staff has agreed to do more to help move our local community, nation, and the world to achieve racial justice. SPICE works in three areas: (1) curriculum development; (2) teacher professional development; and (3) online course offerings. Below are a few recent efforts that SPICE has made with the goal of achieving racial justice.

Curriculum: SPICE launched an interactive website called “What Does It Mean to Be an American?” in 2020. It focuses on topics like civil liberties & equity, civic engagement, and justice & reconciliation and includes videos called “What Does It Mean to Be a Young Black Man in America?” and “What It Means to Be Muslim American.” Student reflections on the website continued to be featured in articles on March 16, 2021, May 18, 2021, and July 20, 2021. This article series will continue in 2021.

SPICE is collaborating with the Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) to introduce underrepresented minority high school students to issues in international security and increase awareness of career opportunities available in international security.

Teacher Professional Development: Given the pandemic, SPICE has transitioned its teacher professional development seminars to online webinars.

SPICE worked with community college educators who participated in the Education Partnership for Internationalizing Curriculum (EPIC) program of Stanford Global Studies. On May 22, 2021, SGS hosted the 2021 EPIC Symposium and SPICE staff moderated two panels.

SPICE offered a webinar, “Indigenous Voices: Educational Perspectives from Navajo, Native Hawaiian, and Ainu Scholars in the Diaspora,” for teachers on June 18, 2021.

From June 28 to July 1, 2021, SPICE hosted a summer institute for middle school teachers that focused on East Asia and the Asian American experience. From July 26 to July 30, 2021, SPICE hosted a similar summer institute for high school teachers. Teachers from 20 states attended the seminars as well as teachers from China and Canada.

Online Course Offerings: SPICE currently offers three courses (on China, Japan, and Korea) for high school students in the United States and courses for students in Japan and China. SPICE seeks to broaden its offerings in the United States.

SPICE pledges to continue to do the following:

  • In its recruitment of students for SPICE’s online classes, we will redouble our efforts to recruit from diverse areas throughout the United States.
  • SPICE will seek to increase the diversity of the teachers who attend its teacher professional development seminars.
  • SPICE will seek to expand the diversity of the students who enroll in its online course offerings.
  • SPICE will continue to host webinars that focus on diversity.
  • SPICE will continue to explore—with the FSI REDI Task Force—additional outreach activities that focus on enhancing diversity at FSI.

 

DEI-related Project Update, Winter and Spring 2022

SPICE serves as a bridge between FSI and K–12 schools and community colleges. As noted in fall 2020, the SPICE staff has agreed to do more to help move our local community, nation, and the world to achieve racial justice. SPICE works in four areas: (1) curriculum development; (2) teacher professional development; (3) online course offerings; and (4) educational research. Below are a few recent efforts that SPICE has made with the goal of achieving racial justice.

Curriculum development: SPICE launched an interactive website called “What Does It Mean to Be an American?” in 2020. It focuses on topics like civil liberties & equity, civic engagement, and justice & reconciliation and includes videos called “What Does It Mean to Be a Young Black Man in America?” and “What It Means to Be Muslim American.” Student reflections on the website continued to be featured in articles on December 14, 2021 and February 8, 2022. This series will continue in 2022.

On the occasion of Veterans Day 2021, SPICE featured an article about Chicanos who served in the Vietnam War. Vietnam War veteran Charley Trujillo is featured. The article is recommended as a supplement to the SPICE unit, Legacies of the Vietnam War, and coverage of the Vietnam War in U.S. history textbooks.

On February 22, 2022, SPICE launched the first of a series of blogs that will feature a selection of photographs by Marion Post Wolcott. Wolcott was hired as a photographer for the Farm Security Administration (FSA), a federal agency dedicated to improving the lives of America’s most impoverished farmers. Her images vividly exposed the social and economic conditions wrought by the Great Depression and Dust Bowl, and included tenant farmers, migrant workers, cotton pickers, and others, all living in poverty and racially divided communities.

SPICE is collaborating with the Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) to introduce underrepresented minority high school students to issues in international security and increase awareness of career opportunities available in international security. Introduction to Issues in International Security features four CISAC scholars whose lectures focus on international security and North Korea’s nuclear program, ethnic cleansing and genocide, terrorism and counterterrorism, and biosecurity. A study guide has been developed to accompany each lecture. CISAC scholars will meet with a select group of students in a webinar this spring.

Starting in April 2022, SPICE will work with SPICE Consultant Dr. Ignacio Ornelas on a lesson about Joe Garcia Kapp, who grew up in East Salinas, California, and was the first in his family to go to college. He went to UC Berkeley and played football for UC Berkeley in 1956. He also played professionally in Canada and in the NFL, bringing the Minnesota Vikings to their first Super Bowl in 1970.

Teacher Professional Development: SPICE continues to work with Dr. Harold Begay, Navajo Nation Superintendent of Schools, Department of Diné Education. SPICE featured his comments on “Growing Up Navajo.” He also participated in a webinar, “Indigenous Voices: Educational Perspectives from Navajo, Native Hawaiian, and Ainu Scholars in the Diaspora,” for teachers last year with two other scholars: Dr. Sachi Edwards, Faculty Member, Soka University in Tokyo, Japan, and Dr. Ronda Māpuana Fuji Shizuko Hayashi-Simpliciano, Vice Principal, Ke Kula Kaiapuni ʻo Ānuenue, Honolulu, Hawaiʻi.

SPICE continues to work with community college educators who participate in the Education Partnership for Internationalizing Curriculum (EPIC) program of Stanford Global Studies. On May 21, 2022, SGS will host the 2022 EPIC Symposium and SPICE staff will moderate a panel of community college educators. Information about last year’s EPIC Symposium can be found here.

From July 25–28, 2022, SPICE will host a summer institute for middle school teachers that will focus on East Asia.

Online Course Offerings: SPICE currently offers three courses (on China, Japan, and Korea) for high school students in the United States and courses for students in Japan and China. SPICE seeks to broaden its offerings in the United States.

SPICE pledges to continue to do the following:

  • In its recruitment of students for SPICE’s online classes, we will redouble our efforts to recruit from diverse areas throughout the United States.
  • SPICE will seek to increase the diversity of the teachers who attend its teacher professional development seminars.
  • SPICE will seek to expand the diversity of the students who enroll in its online course offerings.
  • SPICE will continue to host webinars that focus on diversity.
  • SPICE will continue to explore—with the FSI REDI Task Force—additional outreach activities that focus on enhancing diversity at FSI.